Why Does God Allow Suffering?

A Very Old Question

This is a very old question – possibly as old as man himself. This question has been confronted in the Book of Job, in the psalms such as Psalm 73, and in several other Biblical passages. This has also been a great topic of discussion in philosophy and literature. It is not the purpose of this article to answer all possible questions, nor to create a synopsis of what has already been written.

Tags// , , , ,

A Question of Offense

“Leave as Friends”

A popular door knocking program that has been used to evangelize for Christ has at its center a singular principle: Leave as friends. This can be seen with the idea that while the ultimate goal of any encounter with a prospect in the world is teaching the Gospel and conversion, at the very least (if they are uninterested) leave on a positive, friendly note. This is a generally good principle as it plants a seed that could one day grow to fruition.

Understanding the Journey

Life’s Answers

Life is full of difficulties and hardship, and more so for some then for others. Trying to understand these difficulties and face these hardships leads many to question the purpose for life. Of course, the Bible provides the answers to these questions, assuming man is honest enough with himself to accept them.

Providence is 20/20

Considering Hindsight

There is a common expression: “Hindsight is 20/20”. This expression describes the great clarity of detail surrounding events when viewed from one in the future looking into the past versus a less clear picture of known details in the midst of an event. The use of “20/20” is a term associated with vision, describing crispness and clear vision.

Life is Fleeting

Alexander the Great

In the account of the life of Alexander the Great recorded by the ancient writer Plutarch, the great exploits of this man are told. One of the first to conquer the “four corners” of the known world at still a young age, a story is told and has become tradition of Alexander’s realization of this accomplishment. It is said that, after looking from the peak of a mountain at the kingdom that was his that stretched for as far as the eye could see, he wept for “there were no more worlds to conquer.”