Wanting a Do-Over

A Common Feature

It is a common feature in many types of games to have the opportunity to have a “do-over.” This chance affords the ability to retry where one made a wrong choice or performed badly. Depending on how serious one takes the rules, this chance exists in sports (e.g. the “mulligan” in golf), in some table games (e.g. a “reroll” or “taking back” a move), and in many video games (e.g. just “reload” a saved game).

Playing With Fire

Staring at the Flames

There seems to be an almost natural fascination that human beings have with things that are dangerous for us. It is almost as if we cannot resist being in close proximity to things possibly harmful, or cannot resist finding ourselves in situations where the danger may present itself.

Having a Functional Family

The Ideal Family

The ideal family is many times described as being a healthy, functional family unit. Whenever there is a particular breakdown within the family, the term “dysfunctional” is commonly used. As is commonly the case, many times more focus is placed upon the “dysfunctional” side rather than the “functional” side; it is easier to point out flaw rather than to describe good attributes.

Keeping the Future

Note: This is the combined articles of Jan. 9 (Part One) and of Jan. 16 (Part Two)

Understanding the Problem

Rewriting History

In his acclaimed work Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell wrote “He who controls the past controls the future; he who controls the present controls the past.” These words, written to describe an oppressive dystopia have been proven by the propaganda efforts of several brutal regimes. The Nazis sought to rewrite German history as to control her future. Numerous efforts of agitprop within the Soviet Union sought to cover the atrocities of a very bloody past.

Are We Limiting God?

Limitless by Nature

God by definition of His very nature is limitless. His presence is infinite, His power is absolute, His knowledge is utterly complete. Despite this, however, man has in different ways attempted to place limitations upon God. These limitations are not always intentional, but are the by-product of attempting to understand God in man’s own terms.