Understanding Holiness

Unique Ideas

There are several terms used in the Bible which have truly unique meanings. One such term is “holiness” which can also be understood as being “sanctified.” The words “holy” and “saint” both have the same original word and only translated differently according to the context.

When Everything Goes Wrong

Frustrating Times

There are some times in our lives when it seems that everything goes wrong at the same time. This can be quite frustrating, as one crisis can be dealt with, but multiple crises can make us feel overwhelmed. For example, when you need extra money to pay an unexpected bill, the car will not start. Or when your child needs something special for school, the roof starts to leak. In the world, this has come to be known as Murphy’s Law.

Caveat Emptor

The Frustration of Deception

There are few things in life as frustrating as being deceived. Whether it was being sold a defective product, trusting in someone that betrayed that trust, or receiving bad advice or information; in the end we commonly feel used and foolish. While angry with the one or ones who wronged us, we can be most angry with ourselves for being so gullible.

The Perfect Man for the Job

“But when the fullness of the time came, God sent forth His Son, born of a woman, born under the Law, so that He might redeem those who were under the Law, that we might receive the adoption as sons.” (Gal. 4:4, 5, NASU)

Paul wrote these words to the Galatians describing Jesus as being the perfect man for the mission He was sent to accomplish. There was truly no other person who could fulfill this role, and no one else can claim His position as Lord. This eternal truth is proven in four different ways by Paul.

An Examination of Anger

A Misunderstanding

It has been believed by many that the emotion of anger is in itself sinful. Such an understanding would imply that by simply becoming angry one is violating a law of God and should repent of sin. However, the connection between anger and sin is not a direct correlation. For instance, both God Himself and Christ have become angry over the practice of sin in the world. If anger was inherently sinful, neither God nor Christ could have expressed such an emotion. It is also important to remember the words of Paul, quoting the psalmist when he writes “be angry, and yet do not sin” (Eph. 4:26, NASU.) How could such an act be possible if anger was inherently sinful?