Understanding Sin

A Paradox

In life perhaps there is nothing man understands paradoxically both better and less than sin. Man is familiar with what sin offers in the form of temporal pleasure, seemingly positive temporal benefits, etc. in a legion of ways, going so far as to actually create new and evermore depraved ways to engage in sin. Man knows sin intimately by encouraging its practice and showing wholehearted approval to its furtherance (Rom. 1:32).

Grasping Eternity

Impossible to Comprehend

In truth, it is impossible for man to fully comprehend the ramifications of eternity. We can attempt to use metaphors and illustrations to describe such a concept, but for man, who is trapped in the happenings of time, the concept of limitlessness is beyond our own experience. It is into this realm that God not only promises, but has purposed for His created beings to enter. While we are not eternal beings in the ultimate sense having had a beginning (unlike God who has no beginning), a part of us is created to last beyond the coil of this earthly frame.

A Day of Remembrance?

A Misplaced Focus

The world has focused upon one particular Sunday as a day of remembrance of the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The world entitled this day Easter, although this was not something which God or Christ asked for. Jesus did ask His followers to remember Him, but not in this manner. During the Last Supper, Jesus instituted a memorial which He asked Christians to do “in remembrance of Me” (Luke 22:19, NASU).

The Uncompromising Jesus Christ

Packaging

In the world of marketing, many factors are considered when presenting a particular product or message to the public. At the forefront of these factors lies the interest in understanding the audience, and tailoring the presentation to be the most effective with that audience. This process (sometimes called “packaging”) can be very successful in presenting a product in an attractive and exciting way.

Responding to the Invitation

A Common Practice

At the conclusion of most lessons presented on a Sunday morning or evening worship, there is the common practice of the invitation. This invitation encourages those who have questions, special needs or concerns to publicly share them, many times in light of the message that was just presented. The response is not to any person or the church herself, but instead to God and His Word.