My Yoke Is Easy, My Burden is Light - Mat. 11:30

A Powerful Phrase

This phrase taken from the end of the 11^th^ Chapter of Matthew is a great promise to all who are “weary and heavy-laden” (Mat. 11:28, NASU). This phrase, however, has been greatly misunderstood and taken out of context by many Bible readers. Some have taken this phrase to imply that the Christian life will be “light” and free from labor – this is not the intention of Jesus’ words.

When Do We Start?

The Hardest Step

For many projects, getting started can be the most difficult step. One can spend a surprisingly large amount of time “preparing” or purposing to start “soon.” When it comes to one’s choice to become a better student of the Word of God there too exists a starting point, and this step of starting can be a difficult one. This should seem counterproductive, for Bible study provides the richest rewards for one’s own life, but it also requires commitment and effort – two things that do not come naturally.

The Christian Race: A Sprint or Marathon?

The Christian Walk

The life of a Christian is described in the Bible as “walking in the light” (1 John 1:7, NASU), as a simple “walk” (Eph. 4:1), and a “race” whose finish line is found in heaven (1 Cor. 9:24, 2 Tim. 4:7). Using the “race” analogy, we can describe two different types of “runners,” beginning with the time of their conversion.

Growing Beyond Obligation

A Powerful Transition

When new converts first come to Christ there is a transitional period of change between the old life and a new life in Christ. This can be a difficult period as many things which defined who a person was, ways they enjoyed spending their time, habits and behaviors all must be either reevaluated or replaced by something holy and wholesome. In truth, this process never really ends and lasts throughout the Christian walk, but its biggest impact should come at the time of conversion.

Not Where They Expected

Early Church

With the coming of the church with great power on the Day of Pentecost as recorded in Acts 2, it was inevitable that at some point the apostles and early church would come into conflict with the religious leaders in Jerusalem. These religious leaders had believed they had defeated the followers of Jesus with His crucifixion, but instead an entire new body was being formed in their very city. And this new body was growing, three thousand men on the first day, and more day by day.