Knowing the Destination

Two Different Paths

Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the way is broad that leads to destruction, and there are many who enter through it. For the gate is small and the way is narrow that leads to life, and there are few who find it.
Matthew 7:13, 14 (NASU)

This well-known Scripture taken from the Sermon on the Mount describes a contrast between two distinct paths of life.

More Than Just Skin Deep

The Sword

For the word of God is living and active and sharper than any two-edged sword, and piercing as far as the division of soul and spirit, of both joints and marrow, and able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart.
Hebrews 4:12 (NASU)

This verse describes the Word of God as being more than a mere “rulebook” or “guide” to godly living, but instead having a true living power of its own.

When Do We Start?

The Hardest Step

For many projects, getting started can be the most difficult step. One can spend a surprisingly large amount of time “preparing” or purposing to start “soon.” When it comes to one’s choice to become a better student of the Word of God there too exists a starting point, and this step of starting can be a difficult one. This should seem counterproductive, for Bible study provides the richest rewards for one’s own life, but it also requires commitment and effort – two things that do not come naturally.

How Could There Be Shame?

Important Words

When writing to the Christians in Rome, Paul the apostle told these Christians about his plans to visit them. The primary force for this visit was what he called his own “obligation” to preach to the Gentile world, whether they would accept his message or not (Rom. 1:14). This was driven by these important words:

For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. Rom. 1:16 (NASU)

What Can We Count On?

A Strange Correlation

There seems to be in life a strange correlation between needing a piece of equipment to do something immediately and that same piece of equipment failing completely. This has been called “Murphy’s Law” describing that when the worst can possibly happen, the worst will happen. On balance, this is more likely a perception problem. We seldom notice when equipment functions correctly, but we notice when it does not.