Another Look at the Glass

Personal Outlook

In describing how one approaches the outlook of one’s life, the contrast between optimism and pessimism is the most powerful. These two philosophies embody two distinct ends of perspective toward how to approach problems, either as obstacles or challenges. While there is a degree of over-simplification in this process, as no person tends to be specifically one or the other, optimism vs. pessimism can tell a lot about an individual’s attitude toward life.

Change for the Better

Imperfections of Life

There are things our lives that we would like to change. We all have bad habits we would wish to break, choices we wish we had made differently, and other factors outside of our personal control which frustrate us. When one considers the reality of personal sin in light of the Bible’s teaching, this feeling of a need to change should grow exponentially. It is, of course, through Christ that any such change is possible, by being washed of His blood and conforming ourselves to the pattern of His life.

The Christian Race: A Sprint or Marathon?

The Christian Walk

The life of a Christian is described in the Bible as “walking in the light” (1 John 1:7, NASU), as a simple “walk” (Eph. 4:1), and a “race” whose finish line is found in heaven (1 Cor. 9:24, 2 Tim. 4:7). Using the “race” analogy, we can describe two different types of “runners,” beginning with the time of their conversion.

Growing Beyond Obligation

A Powerful Transition

When new converts first come to Christ there is a transitional period of change between the old life and a new life in Christ. This can be a difficult period as many things which defined who a person was, ways they enjoyed spending their time, habits and behaviors all must be either reevaluated or replaced by something holy and wholesome. In truth, this process never really ends and lasts throughout the Christian walk, but its biggest impact should come at the time of conversion.

Living Up to Your Potential

A Common Challenge

It is a common challenge of young people especially to “live up to their potential.” This idea emphasizes the need to make the best of life – the encouragement to succeed with one’s pursuits and one’s ambitions. Although this is most commonly associated with careers, (such as being successful in business or being a professional such as a doctor or lawyer), this can also be manifest in various arts or sports. In essence, we want people to do the very best they can with their own particular talents and abilities – no one wants to see a young person “waste” the life they have been given.